Skip to content

Settings and activity

1 result found

  1. 29 votes

    We're glad you're here

    Please sign in to leave feedback

    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    How important is this to you?

    We're glad you're here

    Please sign in to leave feedback

    Signed in as (Sign out)
    An error occurred while saving the comment
    back paino commented  · 

    What's happening here is not dissimilar to posture related conditions. Quite often it's a combination of adopting a 'slouch' behind the wheel where the spine is not in a natural 'at rest' position. Instead the lumbar region is being subjected to contortion and constricted movement, which can cause increased uneven pressures in the vertebral joints, and stress and tension in the surrounding muscles and ligaments. This can lead to lower back pain in drivers after long periods behind the wheel. In addition to this the driver is being subjected to 'whole body vibration' which occurs when the body is in contact with a surface that is oscillating e.g. car wheels over an uneven road surface or the vibrations from the vehicle engine. These vibrations are transferred through the body to the spine and soft tissues which in turn can cause damage and back pain. (Source: Magnusson ML, Pope MH, Wilder DG, Areskoug B. Are occupational drivers at an increased risk for developing musculoskeletal spine disorders?)

    https://www.mybackpaincoach.us/